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We were first introduced to Food & Water Watch during an effort to maintain local control of the publicly owned water system in our area. We have continued to support the efforts of FWW as they lobby for the best interests of the people of this planet.
Jennifer Neylon

Research

The Rapid Industrialization of Frac Sand

Published on February 11, 2014 - Issue Briefs: Frac sand is an essential component in the fracking process; it is combined with large quantities of water and toxic chemicals, which are injected underground at high pressure to crack dense rock and release oil and gas.

Trouble Brewing in the Great Lakes

Published on January 29, 2014 - Issue Briefs: Unconventional oil and gas development poses a significant threat to the North American Great Lakes, the largest cluster of freshwater lakes in the world.

Fracking Infrastructure is Carving Up Pennsylvania

Published on December 18, 2013 - Fact Sheets: Absurdly, proponents of shale gas development argue that pipelines can benefit landowners by providing new recreation areas and better habitat for wildlife.

American Water: a Corporate Profile

Published on December 17, 2013 - Fact Sheets: American Water Works Company is the largest publicly traded U.S. water utility company, serving approximately 14 million people in more than 30 states and two Canadian provinces.

An Overview of the Successful Public Purchase of the Felton Water System

Published on November 08, 2013 - Fact Sheets: The San Lorenzo Valley Water District purchased the Felton water system from California American Water. American Water and other companies have tried to distort this successful public purchase to undermine other local buyout efforts. Communities should not heed these corporate scare tactics. Felton has benefited from local, public control of its water services.

The EPA's Failure to Track Factory Farms

Published on August 28, 2013 - Issue Briefs: In the spring of 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released documents in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request that detailed the EPA’s internal process for proposing a CAFO reporting rule, known as the “308 Rule” under Section 308 of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

Fracking Colorado: Illusory Benefits, Hidden Costs

Published on August 19, 2013 - Issue Briefs: Coloradans are increasingly aware of the problems that accompany drilling and fracking for oil and natural gas. Communities are working to ban the practice and, of course, the oil and gas industry is fighting back. But the industry's primary argument - that fracking drives economic growth and prosperity in the state - just doesn't add up.

Take Back the Tap: Bottled Water Wastes Resources and Money

Published on August 05, 2013 - Fact Sheets: The bottled water industry has generated demand for its product through marketing, persuading Americans that bottled water is purer and healthier than tap water, even though the U.S. federal government requires more rigorous safety monitoring of municipal tap water than it does of bottled water.

Veolia Water North America: A Corporate Profile

Published on July 30, 2013 - Fact Sheets: Veolia Water North America is the largest private operator of municipal water and sewer systems in the United States, serving an estimated 10.5 million people in 32 states. Veolia Water North America is a fully owned subsidiary of Veolia Environnement, the world's largest water corporation.

United Water: A Corporate Profile

Published on July 14, 2013 - Fact Sheets: United Water is one of the largest private water companies in the United States, serving about 5.7 million people. The company is a subsidiary of Suez Environnement, the world’s second largest water corporation.

Take Back the Tap: Bottled Water Wastes Resources and Money

Published on June 24, 2013 - Reports: Americans have bought into the myth that bottled water is purer and healthier than tap water. This misconception is largely the result of crafty marketing tactics from the bottled water industry, but the truth is that the federal government requires more rigorous safety monitoring of municipal tap water than it does of bottled water.

Frackademia

Published on May 28, 2013 - Fact Sheets: An extensive review of university research projects funded by “Big Oil” companies revealed insufficient academic control, a lack of peer review and undue industry influence in choosing research proposals.

A Toxic Flood

Published on May 16, 2013 - Reports: The report is based on research conducted at the Political Economy Research Institute of the University of Massachusetts Amherst to compile a ranking of the Toxic 100 Water Polluters.The report shows that leading energy and chemical manufacturing companies are dumping massive amounts of toxic chemicals into surface waters, putting in danger the lives and wellbeing of those exposed to the resulting pollution.

Keep a Nestlé Water Bottling Plant Out of the Columbia River Gorge

Published on April 23, 2013 - Fact Sheets: Nestlé Waters is determined to build and operate a water bottling plant in the Columbia River Gorge town of Cascade Locks, seeking to bottle and sell essential spring water resources.

Borrowing Trouble: Water Privatization Is a False Solution for Municipal Budget Shortfalls

Published on April 04, 2013 - Reports: The 2008 global financial crisis left many governments around the world with serious fiscal challenges. Eroded tax bases and growing health and retirement costs created or worsened local budget deficits across the United States, and a sovereign debt crisis rattled the European Union. Instead of confronting these problems head-on, a number of public officials across the globe sought to lease or sell public water and sewer systems to fund ongoing government functions or to pay down liabilities. That is, they have tried to use water privatization to create the illusion of having balanced the budget, when in fact they are just digging the hole deeper.

U.S. Energy Insecurity: Why Fracking for Oil and Natural Gas Is a False Solution

Published on November 14, 2012 - Reports: Promoters of modern drilling and fracking celebrate the industry’s newfound ability to extract oil and natural gas from shale and other tight rock formations, calling it an energy “revolution,” a “paradigm-shifter,” a “rebirth” and a “game changer.” One recent report claims that North America might soon become “the new Middle East,” a net exporter of oil and natural gas. In April 2012, ConocoPhillips’s CEO at the time called shale gas a “blessing.” But for whom is it really a blessing?

No apueste a Wall Street: la financiarización de la naturaleza y el riesgo para nuestros bienes comunes

Published on October 15, 2012 - Fact Sheets: Promoters of modern drilling and fracking celebrate the industry’s newfound ability to extract oil and natural gas from shale and other tight rock formations, calling it an energy “revolution,” a “paradigm-shifter,” a “rebirth” and a “game changer.” One recent report claims that North America might soon become “the new Middle East,” a net exporter of oil and natural gas. In April 2012, ConocoPhillips’s CEO at the time called shale gas a “blessing.” But for whom is it really a blessing?

Private Equity, Public Inequity: The Public Cost of Private Equity Takeovers of U.S. Water Infrastructure

Published on September 06, 2012 - Fact Sheets: Investment bankers and other major financial players are increasingly interested in taking control of water and sewer services across the United States. Private equity vehicles are armed with more than $100 billion for infrastructure worldwide. Although most deals in the U.S. water utility market have involved existing private sector companies, a number of fund managers anticipate that the ongoing fiscal crisis will drive some governments to privatize their water infrastructure. To make that prediction a reality, major financial interests are backing various government proposals that facilitate privatization and private investment bankers and other major financial players are increasingly interested in taking control of water and sewer services across the United States. Private equity vehicles are armed with more than $100 billion for infrastructure worldwide. Although most deals in the U.S. water utility market have involved existing private sector companies, a number of fund managers anticipate that the ongoing fiscal crisis will drive some governments to privatize their water infrastructure. To make that prediction a reality, major financial interests are backing various government proposals that facilitate privatization and private financing of public infrastructure.

Allentown's Water Gambit: An Irresponsible and Risky Lease

Published on August 31, 2012 - Fact Sheets: Allentown is considering a risky and potentially very costly ploy to raise money to cover some of its pension liabilities. Mayor Ed Pawlowski has proposed a 50-year lease of the water and sewer systems that he hopes will produce $150 million to $200 million in upfront cash for the city.1 This money, however, is not cheap. Any upfront payment that the city receives is a costly loan that households and local businesses will repay through their water bills for decades. While Allentown's fiscal difficulties are certainly serious, the city must address the issue directly and avoid budget gimmicks like water privatization that will increase costs for generations of Allentonians.

Private Equity, Public Inequity: The Public Cost of Private Equity Takeovers of U.S. Water Infrastructure

Published on August 22, 2012 - Reports: Investment bankers and other major financial players are increasingly interested in taking control of water and sewer services across the United States. Private equity vehicles are armed with more than $100 billion for infrastructure worldwide. Although most deals in the U.S. water utility market have involved existing private sector companies, a number of fund managers anticipate that the ongoing fiscal crisis will drive some governments to privatize their water infrastructure. To make that prediction a reality, major financial interests are backing various government proposals that facilitate privatization and private financing of public infrastructure.
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