We Defeated A Sneaky LNG Proposal, But It Won’t Be The Last We Need To Fight In Florida

Categories

Climate and Energy

by Michelle Allen

Strom Inc. probably hoped we would never find out what they were trying to get approved. But while working on passing a local measure in front of the Tampa City Council to end fossil fuel use and transition to 100% renewables, imagine our surprise when we learned about a proposed Tampa fracked gas project that had been quietly moving forward for years. 

Not only did Food & Water Watch bury that plan to transport dangerous bomb trains through Tampa and deal a blow to a proposed Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) site nearby, on August 5th, Food & Water Watch succeeded in getting the Tampa City Council to pass the anti-fossil fuel resolution. This city measure calls on Congressmembers like Tampa Representative Kathy Castor to act boldly to transition us off fossil fuels. But we’re back to the grindstone this week to protect the people and environment from more sneaky fracked gas proposals like the one Strom Inc. tried to get past us all.  

Sneaky Strom Inc. Aimed To Profit From Dangerous, Climate-Threatening Liquefied Natural Gas

Strom Inc. wanted to build a fracked gas liquefaction facility in Crystal River, FL, and transport the resulting LNG over 80 miles to Port Tampa Bay for international export. Strom has received export approval from the Department of Energy. 

LNG is fracked gas that has been supercooled into a liquid form. Once liquefied, it is transported over long distances, including by ship for international export.

At a time when moving away from fossil fuels is critical for avoiding the worst climate impacts — and more officials may act soon in ways that threaten fossil fuel investments — the fossil fuel industry is doubling down on LNG while they can. Buildout of these facilities in Florida is part of a national push by the industry to build LNG export terminals in coastal communities. Two other LNG facilities are already in operation in the Sunshine State, in Jacksonville and Medley. 

Fracking and LNG contribute to climate catastrophe, and the transport of LNG is extremely dangerous due to its flammability. Before LNG is loaded onto ships for international export, it’s transported on trucks or rail cars. These “LNG bomb” trucks and trains have enormous potential energy that rivals atomic bombs, and they’re transporting it on public highways and railways near dense communities, endangering the people who live and work there. 

Strom Inc.’s  proposal to liquefy fracked gas in Crystal River and transport the LNG over 80 miles to Port Tampa Bay by truck or train put millions of Tampa Bay residents at risk — and the government barely blinked an eye. 

If The Government Isn’t Protecting Us From Dangerous LNG Plots, Who Is?

Despite the immense risks posed by Strom Inc.’s LNG proposal, the project has been met with very little government scrutiny. This also means there was no opportunity for public input in Tampa. Alarmed by this, Food & Water Watch worked to bring this dangerous proposal to light. We worked with Tampa Bay Times investigative reporters to dig up more information. That investigation uncovered Strom Inc. had been providing the Department of Energy false information about their project for years

Food & Water Watch also planned actions to bring more public attention to the dangerous LNG proposal. On June 15th, we showed up to the Port Tampa Bay’s board meeting to express our disapproval of plans to export LNG from the port and urge the Board to reject the proposal. During the meeting, the Port’s primary counsel stated that the Port has no plans to export LNG with Strom Inc. Additionally, the Tampa Bay Times’ investigation uncovered Strom Inc. does not have the ability to build their liquefaction plant at the property they’ve been planning around. Since Strom does not have a location to liquefy gas or a port to export it from, this project is effectively dead. Food & Water Watch is working to formalize this victory by urging the Department of Energy to pull Strom’s permits for exporting LNG. 

Food & Water Watch volunteers participated in actions to oppose LNG buildout.

Strom Inc.’s LNG Facility Is Dead In The Water, But What About The Others?

While this LNG proposal in the Tampa Bay region appears to be dead, Florida’s existing LNG facilities continue to pose risks to communities in Miami-Dade and Jacksonville. Similar to Strom’s proposal, the Miami-Dade LNG facility faced very little scrutiny and government oversight, receiving only approvals from the Department of Energy. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is charged with approving and regulating LNG facilities. However, the fossil fuel industry is finding ways to evade FERC oversight, leaving communities in the dark about these projects and without opportunity for input or objections. 

To make matters worse, LNG is also being transported along Florida’s East Coast on the Florida East Coast Railway, putting communities along the train’s route at risk of dangerous LNG “bomb trains.” This LNG infrastructure buildout must be stopped. 

As if the existing facilities aren’t bad enough, the fossil fuel industry continues to plan even more of them in Jacksonville and the Panhandle, and we expect more dangerous proposals. We need sweeping legislation from Congress to ban LNG facilities and export in Florida and everywhere. That’s why we’re launching a campaign opposing the buildout of new LNG infrastructure across Florida. 

You can help. Send your member of Congress a message about banning LNG exports!

We Have A Tiny Window To Combat Climate Change. Biden Must Stop Wasting It.

Categories

Climate and Energy

by Mark Schlosberg

Humanity received a stark warning this week. The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was released on August 9, 2021 and it was a grave moment of recognition for those who are paying attention to climate change. Like previous reports, but in more urgent and clear terms, the scientific report was a devastating account of the impact of fossil fuels on our climate, and what the future holds if we do not radically shift course.

While the key messages from the report are far from new (scientists have been warning about the impact of human activity on the climate for generations), the urgency of the writing and call to action — as we are in the midst of climate change supercharged fires, droughts, extreme heat, and an impending hurricane season — was more clear than ever. 

As the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres said, the report “is a code red for humanity.  The alarm bells are deafening, and the evidence is irrefutable: greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel burning and deforestation are choking our planet and putting billions of people at immediate risk.”

The report is long and detailed — the summary version alone is 42 pages — with lots of interesting, devastating, and somewhat depressing scientific reality. Ultimately, though, that reality shows us why we must act now. Here are five key takeaways you should know about.

1. Climate Change is Here, Escalating, and Being Driven by Fossil Fuels

The report lays out in great detail the scientific consensus that not only have fossil fuels driven the climate crisis, but that because of the tremendous amount of carbon pumped into the atmosphere, 1.5 degrees of warming is already a certainty, regardless of what policies we enact. According to the report, “many changes due to past and future greenhouse gas emissions are irreversible for centuries to millennia, especially changes in the ocean, ice sheets and global sea level.” 

This does not mean action is futile — to the contrary the report highlights how much worse things will get if we continue on our present course and how much destruction will be avoided if we make major changes now. But in the short term, droughts, fires, extreme heat, and other climate impacts will continue to increase. As climate scientist Michael Mann said in response to the report, “Bottom line is that we have zero years left to avoid dangerous climate change, because it’s here.”

2. Methane in Particular is A Key Driver of Climate Chaos

In addition to the need to dramatically reduce carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere, the report also focused on the need to slash methane emissions. Methane is the core component of natural gas and as a greenhouse gas is 86 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 20 year period. Fracking and factory farms have been key drivers of methane increases — it’s no coincidence that these are the two bans we’ve been calling for nationally. 

Food & Water Watch has been warning about the impact of methane from fracking and fracked gas infrastructure for years and the IPCC concurred. According to the report, “strong, rapid and sustained reductions in CH4 (methane) emissions” would help limit warming and improve air quality.

As IPCC report reviewer Durwood Zaelke told Reuters, “cutting methane is the single biggest and fastest strategy for slowing down warming.”

3. We Can Still Avoid the Worst Impacts of Runaway Climate change, But We Must Act Now

Despite the bleak outlook, the report does have one silver lining and that is if we act now — and act boldly — we can still avoid a much worse climate future, which will make a tremendous difference in how livable our planet is and in the lives of millions of people. 

According to the report, “with every additional increment of global warming, changes in extremes continue to become larger.” We have a chance to significantly limit warming if we act now to rein in fossil fuels. It will make the difference between 1.5 degrees of warming and 4.4 degrees. In practical terms, this will mean significantly less drought, extreme weather, fires, flooding, and overall destruction.

4. We Must Immediately Stop Subsidizing the Fossil Fuel Industry and Halt New Fracking, Pipelines and Other Fossil Fuel Infrastructure

There is a clear path back from the climate cliff, but it will entail bold action at every level of government. It will mean we stop subsidizing the fossil fuel industry, ban fracking, halt new fossil fuel power plants, pipelines, and other fossil fuel infrastructure, ban factory farms and transition away from industrial agriculture, and make bold investments in renewable energy, regional sustainable agriculture, and invest to make our water systems, housing, and other infrastructure climate resilient. 

Meaningfully taking on and dismantling the fossil fuel industry as we transition to a 100% renewable energy system must be a core focus. As the United Nations Secretary General said on the release of the report, “This report must sound a death knell for coal and fossil fuels, before they destroy our planet. There must be no new coal plants built after 2021… Countries should also end all new fossil fuel exploration and production, and shift fossil fuel subsidies into renewable energy.”

5. Biden Must Take Bold Action to Lead Us Back From the Climate Cliff

The climate crisis requires bold leadership. The United States has been responsible for more emissions than any other country on earth and is the largest economy in the world. President Biden could use his platform and executive powers as President of the United States to rally the global community to take on this crisis head on. 

He could look at the science and call for an immediate halt to new fossil fuel projects, he could call for an immediate ban on fracking to tackle the methane issue head on, and he could lead a quick and immediate transition away from fossil fuels.

Unfortunately, President Biden, despite calling climate change an existential threat, continues to advance half measures and in many cases continues to approve oil and gas projects. We have been tracking the moves by his administration and they include approving massive amounts of fracking and drilling permits, backing the dirty and destructive Dakota Access and Line 3 pipelines, promoting fracked gas exports, and supporting a project in Alaska that will produce 100,000 barrels of oil a day for 30 years.

Taking action against these projects does not require congressional approval. They are all within President Biden’s executive authority.

The day the report was released, Biden tweeted, “We can’t wait to tackle the climate crisis. The signs are unmistakable. The science is undeniable. And the cost of inaction keeps mounting.” We couldn’t agree more. President Biden needs to lead with his actions and it’s up to us to compel him to do it.

Your friends need to see this and we all need to demand more of President Biden.

Will you share this article?

Salesforce System Administrator

Contact Email: [email protected]

Post Date: 08.06.21

Job Type: Full-time

Office Location: Remote

Department: Tools & Data

Job Description: 

The Salesforce System Administrator administers and maintains the Salesforce Platform, Marketing Cloud, Springboard, and other Salesforce integrated applications for Food & Water Watch and Food & Water Action. The Salesforce System Administrator analyzes, installs, and when necessary, designs and develops unique, internal customer-based solutions/applications to extend the value of the Salesforce platform for FWW/FWA.

The Salesforce System Administrator also supports and maintains Salesforce platform-specific applications as well as integrations with third-party applications/systems. This position provides technical development and support to the Salesforce.com environment ensuring it aligns with and meets FWW/FWA’s business requirements as well as IT standards and best practices.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

  1. Serve as primary System Administrator for the Salesforce platform and environment with 100+ users.
  2. Supervise and manage staff charged with managing, integrating and optimizing FWW/FWA data by overseeing all work and content produced by the team.
  3. Responsible for maintaining the functional areas of data management, accounts, contacts, leads, campaigns, donations, dashboards and reports etc. for the Salesforce. platform.
  4. Responsible for monitoring and assist in maintaining licenses for the Salesforce Platform, Marketing Cloud, Springboard, and other integrated third-party applications.
  5. Manage or monitor ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) data management processes moving data to and from internal and external sources.
  6. Implement new enhancements including creation of custom objects, workflows, email alerts and templates, etc.
  7. Perform development, testing, implementation, documentation and updating as it relates to the Salesforce platform software and system administration.
  8. Maintain and implement all back-up processes of Salesforce Platform data.
  9. Develop, deploy, and maintain custom and third-party applications within the Force.com platform and AppExchange.
  10. Main liaison with Salesforce and associated third party vendors and consultants (Jackson River, Kell Partners, TMC, etc.) and associated third party application vendors (TaskRay, ELTON, Apsona, FormAssembly, etc.).
  11. Gather and document business and technical requirements.
  12. Maintain and develop current and new documentation according to system setups, business policies, processes, and procedures.
  13. Write technical approach and design documentation.
  14. Work closely with internal departments and external business partners to maintain and enhance the Salesforce platform’s capabilities.
  15. Participate in project management of maintenance and development projects.
  16. Participate in cross-functional teams that address strategic organizational issues involving Nonprofit Success Pack (NPSP) and integrated applications.
  17. Train staff and colleagues in above listed responsibility areas to build capacity across the organization, e.g., one-on-one coaching, written, recorded and live trainings.
  18. Maintain and expand expertise in the Marketing Cloud, Springboard, Salesforce apps, and other related toolsets.
  19. Monitor new features and recommend ways to take full advantage of the system
  20. Implement user experiences that surface data to users in the most efficient and effective manner.
  21. Maintain and govern users, profiles, permissions, and security.
  22. Understand the data needs of different teams within the organization and interpret those needs into data management practices
  23. Create and share supporter queries and reports for online and offline communication purposes in conjunction with the teams that use our systems.
  24. Create business rules and workflows for regular organizational database processes related to advocacy and fundraising efforts and optimize current systems then to work with relevant staff to test and implement.
  25. Create new protocols, workflows, and adoption training for staff to use Salesforce, Marketing Cloud, Springboard, and other related tools that integrate with Salesforce for their daily work.
  26. Other duties as assigned.

Requirements

  • Education: Bachelor’s degree, or equivalent experience required
  • Excellent interpersonal, writing and verbal skills are required
  • Passion for the mechanics of fundraising and building a culture of philanthropy
  • Approach interactions with donors and supporters with a customer-service mindset
  • Ability to work well with a wide range of people, under pressure in a fast-paced environment
  • Ability to work on multiple projects simultaneously with close attention to detail
  • Good computer skills are required, including strong proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite and Google Docs
  • Experience with Salesforce or similar database, or a demonstrated capacity to learn new technology quickly and effectively
  • Strong interest in and commitment to promoting the goals of Food & Water Watch

QUALIFICATIONS: To perform this job successfully, the person in this position has a high degree of contact with Salesforce, Marketing Cloud, and Related Application Users; a moderate degree of contact with other staff; and a low degree of contact with Non-Salesforce Users.

The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.                                                  

Education/Experience:

  • Experience with Nonprofit Success Pack (NPSP) and Nonprofit processes required.
  • Minimum three years of experience as a Salesforce Administrator preferred.
  • Salesforce Admin (ADX201 and ADX211) certified preferred.
  • A documented history of successful project completion.
  • A demonstrated ability to understand and articulate complex processes.
  • Strong Salesforce interest and ability to quickly master new technology.
  • Strong understanding of the Salesforce platform, with the ability to build custom apps and objects, formula fields, processes, custom views, and other content of intermediate complexity preferred.
  • Strong understanding of Salesforce best practices and functionality preferred.

Compensation is dependent upon experience and based on labor market.

Computer Skills: The incumbent must work in a computerized environment and have adequate knowledge of word processing, email, internet, and spreadsheet software; have coursework or certification in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint and proficiency with all other Microsoft Office products.

Click here to apply. Please include your resume, cover letter and three professional references to be considered.

We will review your application and if we feel that your knowledge, skills and abilities are potentially a good match for our organization, we will be in contact with you. Please include a Cover Letter with your submission. Position open until filled. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Food & Water Watch (FWW) strives for a diverse work environment and encourages women, people of color, LGBTQ individuals, and individuals with disabilities to apply.

Food & Water Watch is committed to the health and safety of its staff members. Moreover, FWW, as an organization, promotes science-based policy. Science clearly shows that unvaccinated populations drive the spread of the coronavirus and the emergence of new variants, and that unvaccinated people are more likely to contract COVID and experience severe symptoms. Effective immediately, prospective new staff members are required to provide proof of vaccination or request a waiver as a condition of their offer of employment.

Help us fix the broken systems that threaten natural resources and stand up against corporate control.

Submit your résumé today!

Salesforce Business Analyst

Contact Email: [email protected]

Post Date: 08.06.21

Job Type: Full-time

Office Location: Remote

Department: Tools & Data

Job Description: 

The Salesforce Business Analyst participates in all phases of our Salesforce processes including requirement documentation, user stories, solution design, unit testing, and project management. The solutions provided can vary from creating/updating approval processes, workflows, validation rules, managing third-party AppExchange products, fields and page layout, and various other Salesforce configurations. They have an advanced understanding of the Salesforce capabilities to ensure the best solution is provided to the stakeholders.

This role requires organization, initiative, creativity, and the ability to act as a solution consultant for internal stakeholders leveraging our Salesforce technology and digital solutions. This person is responsible for working with users from all programs/departments internally at all levels within Food & Water Watch. They are able to speak about and present both strategic and tactical items; they liaison with programs/stakeholders to help translate their requirements into technical solutions. They collaborate with developers to test and verify that solutions meet the business requirements and participate in key meetings with stakeholders including requirement sessions, system demos, user acceptance testing, and end-user training.

The ideal candidate has prior experience in the Salesforce ecosystem, Nonprofit Success Pack (NPSP), Nonprofit processes, and has a desire to learn about our Salesforce ecosystem and internal processes.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

  1. Supervise and manage staff charged with designing and developing business intelligence and reporting solutions for complex analysis.
  2. Gather, understand, and define program business requirements, business processes as well as documenting the programs objectives, use cases/stories, business requirements, and system specifications.
  3. Develop/enhance user stories and to-be process flows to support the design and development of Salesforce solutions.
  4. Work collaboratively with team members to design a solution that meets a program’s business requirements and fulfill user stories.
  5. Collaborate on the configuration for user stories within Salesforce, AppExchange products, or other cloud-based technologies.
  6. Collaborate with developers to test and verify that solutions meet the program’s business requirements.
  7. Troubleshoot and resolve basic and advanced support issues as needed when an issue is escalated.
  8. Other duties as assigned.

Requirements

  • Education: Bachelor’s degree, or equivalent experience required
  • Excellent interpersonal, writing and verbal skills are required
  • Passion for the mechanics of fundraising and building a culture of philanthropy
  • Approach interactions with donors and supporters with a customer-service mindset
  • Ability to work well with a wide range of people, under pressure in a fast-paced environment
  • Ability to work on multiple projects simultaneously with close attention to detail
  • Good computer skills are required, including strong proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite and Google Docs
  • Experience with Salesforce or similar database, or a demonstrated capacity to learn new technology quickly and effectively
  • Strong interest in and commitment to promoting the goals of Food & Water Watch

QUALIFICATIONS: To perform this job successfully, the person in this position has a high degree of contact with Salesforce, Marketing Cloud, and Related Application Users; a moderate degree of contact with other staff; and a low degree of contact with Non-Salesforce Users.

The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.                                                  

Education/Experience:

Bachelor’s Degree (BA, BS, etc.) and 4-6 years of fundraising experience in a relevant field or program. We are seeking an individual who has:

  • Bachelor’s degree in a technology field preferred.
  • Experience with Nonprofit Success Pack (NPSP) and Nonprofit processes preferred.
  • Salesforce Admin (ADX201 and ADX211) certified preferred.
  • Experience with Salesforce technical solutions such as workflow rules, process builder, flow designed, validation rules, custom fields, page layouts, Lightning designer and working with AppExchange products.
  • 2+ years’ Business Analyst experience or focus on project/program management.
  • 2+ years’ experience leveraging and configuring the Salesforce platform to develop a solution.
  • 1+ years’ experience soliciting, gathering, and analyzing user input and requirements.
  • 1+ years’ experience documenting user stories and creating to-be process flow diagrams.

Compensation is dependent upon experience and based on labor market.

Computer Skills: The incumbent must work in a computerized environment and have adequate knowledge of word processing, email, internet, and spreadsheet software; have coursework or certification in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint and proficiency with all other Microsoft Office products.

Click here to apply. Please include your resume, cover letter and three professional references to be considered.

We will review your application and if we feel that your knowledge, skills and abilities are potentially a good match for our organization, we will be in contact with you. Please include a Cover Letter with your submission. Position open until filled. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Food & Water Watch (FWW) strives for a diverse work environment and encourages women, people of color, LGBTQ individuals, and individuals with disabilities to apply.

Food & Water Watch is committed to the health and safety of its staff members. Moreover, FWW, as an organization, promotes science-based policy. Science clearly shows that unvaccinated populations drive the spread of the coronavirus and the emergence of new variants, and that unvaccinated people are more likely to contract COVID and experience severe symptoms. Effective immediately, prospective new staff members are required to provide proof of vaccination or request a waiver as a condition of their offer of employment.

Help us fix the broken systems that threaten natural resources and stand up against corporate control.

Submit your résumé today!

Manager of Monthly Giving

Contact Email: [email protected]

Post Date: 08.06.21

Job Type: Full-time

Office Location: Negotiable (this position is approved for remote work, with a preference for DC-based candidates).

Department: Development

Job Description: 

The Manager of Monthly Giving has responsibility for the monthly giving program at Food & Water Watch including online and offline strategies. The Membership Manager will develop the monthly giving strategy, oversee day-to-day operations of this program, and personally manage a portfolio of high-value monthly donors. This individual will also work with and oversee Food & Water Watch staff to meet their monthly donor fundraising goals. This position reports to the Director of Philanthropic Operations. This position is approved for remote work, with a preference for DC-based candidates. This is a Bargaining Unit/Union Position.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

  1. Work across departments including with our digital and organizing teams to develop and implement monthly donor recruitment campaigns, define key performance measures and track the tactics and strategy across all channels including: direct mail, email, web, social media, events, and personal relationships.
  2. Develop an annual communications strategy that builds a sense of community, and conveys and shows appreciation for the impact monthly donors have on Food & Water Watch’s mission.
  3. Create and oversee retention and upgrade strategies, including the use of automated messages and personal outreach.
  4. Steward and cultivate high-value monthly-donor members by creating a strategy to engage them through mail, phone, digital, text and personal communications. Maintain a donor portfolio of at least 100 monthly donors.
  5. Manage the monthly donor acknowledgement program using unique and inspiring ways to deepen their commitment. This includes working with Food & Water Watch staff to thank monthly donors and personally making calls to thank monthly donors.
  6. Manage the reporting and tracking of the monthly giving program and meet annual fundraising goals.
  7. Work with the Food & Water Watch digital team to ensure that the online strategies, needs, and activities of the monthly giving program are fully and seamlessly integrated and coordinated with overall digital strategy; this individual liaisons with the digital team on a regular basis.
  8. Manage and work with staff of Food & Water Watch to ensure they are meeting their monthly donor fundraising goals. This includes strategy sessions with the team, creating written materials for their needs and creating processes and systems for tracking progress.
  9. In collaboration with the Food & Water Watch salesforce team, ensure good data hygiene and manage all monthly giving operations including acknowledgments, processing gifts and maintaining data to ensure accuracy. Work with our existing database (Salesforce) and other digital tools to manage the monthly giving program, suggesting new tools or platforms as needed.
  10. Other duties as assigned.
  11. Support Our Culture of Philanthropy: Demonstrate an understanding of the essential role of our members and supporters, and consistently serve as an ambassador for FWW/FWA and our work. Participate in or attend events and other activities as appropriate that are organized for our supporters and donors. Be cognizant of fundraising opportunities and share contacts and information that will help build and sustain FWW/FWA.

Requirements

  • Education: Bachelor’s degree, or equivalent experience required
  • Excellent interpersonal, writing and verbal skills are required
  • Passion for the mechanics of fundraising and building a culture of philanthropy
  • Approach interactions with donors and supporters with a customer-service mindset
  • Ability to work well with a wide range of people, under pressure in a fast-paced environment
  • Ability to work on multiple projects simultaneously with close attention to detail
  • Good computer skills are required, including strong proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite and Google Docs
  • Experience with Salesforce or similar database, or a demonstrated capacity to learn new technology quickly and effectively
  • Strong interest in and commitment to promoting the goals of Food & Water Watch

QUALIFICATIONS: To perform this job successfully, the person in this position has a high degree of contact with donors and prospects; a high degree of contact with Managing Directors and other staff; and a high degree of contact with non-development related activities.

The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.                                                  

Education/Experience:

Bachelor’s Degree (BA, BS, etc.) and 4-6 years of fundraising experience in a relevant field or program. We are seeking an individual who has:

  • A proven track record of managing and growing a monthly-giving program at a nonprofit organization.
  • An appreciation for the unique expectations and needs of monthly donors, informed by the philanthropy best practices and the latest research.
  • Self-sufficiency in building reports and tracking metrics in a database such as Salesforce.
  • Exceptional written and verbal communication skills for donor communications and internal communications.

Computer Skills: An individual should be able to work in a computerized environment and have adequate knowledge of word processing, email, internet and spreadsheet software; in particular have coursework or certification in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint and proficiency with all other Microsoft Office products.

Click here to apply. Please include your resume, cover letter and three professional references to be considered.

We will review your application and if we feel that your knowledge, skills and abilities are potentially a good match for our organization, we will be in contact with you. Please include a Cover Letter with your submission. Position open until filled. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Food & Water Watch (FWW) strives for a diverse work environment and encourages women, people of color, LGBTQ individuals, and individuals with disabilities to apply.

Food & Water Watch is committed to the health and safety of its staff members. Moreover, FWW, as an organization, promotes science-based policy. Science clearly shows that unvaccinated populations drive the spread of the coronavirus and the emergence of new variants, and that unvaccinated people are more likely to contract COVID and experience severe symptoms. Effective immediately, prospective new staff members are required to provide proof of vaccination or request a waiver as a condition of their offer of employment.

Help us fix the broken systems that threaten natural resources and stand up against corporate control.

Submit your résumé today!

EPA Should Rewrite Trump’s Awful Rule And Help States Protect Their Water

Categories

Clean Water

by Adam Carlesco

In the fight to protect our waters from reckless permitting by the federal government, the drafters of the Clean Water Act (CWA) ensured that state governments had the authority to deny federal permits for infrastructure projects that violate state laws. This authority comes from Section 401 of the CWA and has allowed states to block a number of oil and gas pipelines, like the Northeast Supply Enhancement project, due to the harm they’d cause to state water. This authority is a vital tool in stopping the expansion of fossil fuel infrastructure in states with strong climate goals and the preservation of this power is necessary to avert the worst effects of climate change.

Trump’s Administration Wrote A Bad Clean Water Act Rule, And Biden’s EPA Must Fix It

For the past four decades, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has understood that states have broad discretion in how they review whether a project will significantly impact a waterbody within its borders. But in July 2020 the Trump administration finalized a major regulatory change that hastened state and tribal authorities’ timelines for reviewing such projects. Making things worse, it also severely limited the factors that state agencies could consider when deciding whether to certify a project. It’s clear that this rule was enacted to stop states like New York from protecting water people depend on for life. If this rule isn’t rewritten, it will lead to more oil and gas pipelines being approved without critical state review.

Understanding this, the Biden Administration has directed EPA to review the 2020 CWA §401 Certification Rule for legal deficiencies and amend the rule as needed so it aligns with the principles of state sovereignty and protects water bodies and the climate. Currently, EPA is considering how it can improve the state certification process and will likely be proposing a new rule in late 2021 or early 2022. To guide that proposal, Food & Water Watch has submitted comments advising the agency on how best to address the dual challenge of climate change and water contamination.

The 2020 Trump Rule Wholly Undermines The Spirit And Intent Of The Clean Water Act

Under the 2020 Trump Rule, EPA shortened timelines for states to review a project’s compliance with state law, requiring the timeframe for review to begin immediately when a developer submits an application – even if lacking vital information. Going forward, the EPA must amend this so the clock starts only once a state certifying authority deems an application administratively complete. Also, EPA must allow applicants to voluntarily withdraw their request and resubmit it at a later date when there is inadequate information for a state authority to make an informed final decision. Without that flexibility, this practice will result in more states denying certification to avoid inadvertently waiving their review authority. It is also incredibly important for states to be able to delay certification until the completion of an environmental review as required by the National Environmental Policy Act.

The 2020 Rule has also severely narrowed the scope of what review criteria a state can consider when determining whether a project complies with state law. EPA must reiterate that state certification must consider the impacts of any “discharge” as the Clean Water Act requires, not just a “discharge of pollutants” which is a wholly different legal term not present in Section 401 of the statute. Despite the Trump administration’s insistence that Section 401 applies only to “point sources of pollution” (e.g., wastewater coming directly out of a pipe into a river), in actuality, the CWA requires a review of any activity that may result in a discharge, including from non-point sources (e.g., pesticide run-off from golf courses). EPA must correct this gross misreading of the statute if states are to meaningfully assess the full scope of a project’s potential harm.

The damage caused by such shortened timelines and a narrowed scope of review is heightened by the 2020 Rule’s requirements that force states to waive their certification authority if a final decision is not made within EPA’s definition of a “reasonable” period of time or if it contains conditions that EPA objects to. It is of the utmost importance that EPA allows flexibility in its determination of a “reasonable time” for review that allows states to request additional data necessary for informed decision-making, without the looming threat of waiving state certifying authority. 

Moreover, EPA must respect state conditions when approving a project. Conditional approval of a project is meant to allow a project — that would otherwise not be certified — to move forward with strict conditions on approval. Stripping conditions from a conditional certification allows projects to proceed which, without those state-issued conditions, would be in violation of state law. As such, EPA must respect state sovereignty in determining when a project would violate state law without a condition and in determining what a reasonable amount of time is for reviewing a project within the statutory one-year limit.

EPA is anticipated to issue a notice of proposed rulemaking within a few months which the public can comment on. Food & Water Watch will be involved in submitting comments to EPA that call on a robust review process that protects our waters and will be sure to alert our supporters on how they can get involved when a proposed rule is announced.

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A Note About What’s Next To Protect Waterways:

Protecting the waterways of this nation must be an all-of-government effort. As such, it is important that EPA coordinate their regulatory plans with the U.S Army Corps of Engineers and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, as these agencies oversee dredging of waterways and gas pipeline permitting respectively.  Without a coordinated regulatory reform for all three agencies, priorities and legislative interpretations may become conflicted or incompatible, which would result in weakened waterbody protections and uncertainty in permitting for water-crossings of public utility lines, like much-needed water infrastructure.

We Must Hold Iowa Accountable For Failing To Protect Public Water

Categories

Clean Water

by Emma Schmit

Iowa is in the midst of a water crisis. People across the state are suffering as another year of drought — intensified by climate change — impacts water usage, crop growth, and the development of toxic blue-green algae blooms in our rivers and lakes. Climate change is worsening the already dangerous conditions from upstream factory farms polluting Iowa’s waterways — it’s more critical than ever for the state to take bold, meaningful action to mitigate the risks facing our water.

Iowa Can’t Fix Its Water Problems By Asking Residents To Reduce Consumption

Reduced water consumption — currently recommended by Des Moines Water Works for the capital region — is a simplistic, short-term answer to a complex, long-term problem. Drought is far from the only challenge facing Iowa’s waters. Nearly 60% of the state’s assessed waters are impaired, attesting to issues far greater than a lack of precipitation affecting our waterways. The Raccoon River, which is used to supply over half a million central Iowans with clean drinking water, was named by American Rivers as one of the nation’s ten Most Endangered Rivers

It’s a direct result of the state’s continued failure to address the grave threats confronting the river — namely pollution from factory farms and industrial agriculture. Rather than protecting the water Iowans rely on for drinking and outdoor recreation, our elected officials have allowed massive agribusinesses to run roughshod over our precious — and finite — water resources. The only thing most of our elected officials have offered is industry-dictated false solutions to improve our water quality — and they aren’t working. Voluntary mechanisms, like the industry-backed Nutrient Reduction Strategy, only benefit corporate agribusiness, and Iowa’s water crisis has only worsened since these voluntary measures have been enacted. 

The industry has exerted its outsized influence over our elected officials for too long. That’s why Food & Water Watch & Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement sued the state of Iowa for failing to protect our right to clean water.

The Iowa Supreme Court Makes A Mind Boggling Decision In Our Case Against Iowa

On June 18, the Iowa Supreme Court released its decision in our case, Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement and Food & Water Watch v. State of Iowa. By a slim 4-3 majority, the Court dismissed the case. Former director of the Drake Agriculture Law Center, Neil Hamilton, published a thorough breakdown of the ruling. Like Mr. Hamilton, we found the Court’s decision to dismiss misguided, as it was based on claims that it is not their responsibility to “hold the State accountable to the public.” 

“If it is not the role of the Iowa Supreme Court to hold the State accountable to the public, then who does have that role?”

— Neil Hamilton, Agricultural Law Expert

Great question.

We have 18,400 members in Iowa. We are committed on their behalf to exhausting all options to protect Iowa’s people, communities, and environment. On July 1st, we filed a petition for reconsideration with the Iowa Supreme Court requesting that the four-justice majority re-examine their ruling. While it is uncommon for such petitions to be granted, in a Court decision as divided as this, we believe we have an obligation to our members and the people of Iowa to do everything we can to fight for our right to clean water. 

A Moratorium On New Factory Farms Is The Only Fix For Iowa’s Water Issues 

Through the lawsuit, we hoped to establish a clear, actionable path forward to ensure the water we use for drinking, cooking, swimming, fishing, and recreating is reliable, safe, and clean. A win in the lawsuit would have replaced failed, voluntary half-measures for waterway cleanup with a demand that the state institute mandatory practices to reduce the harmful levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in Iowa’s waterways. To effectively cut back on these polluting nutrients, the state would need to implement a moratorium on new factory farms in the Raccoon River watershed to limit the already exorbitant amount of manure runoff occurring as a result of more than 750 factory farms producing billions of gallons of waste each year. 

We know the future of our state’s water will be bleak if we continue down the current path. We cannot continue to allow the unabated growth of unsustainable, polluting factory farms fed by industrial monoculture crop production if we hope to see thriving communities, economies, and environments in Iowa’s future. We must build a new path that puts the needs of our communities, our drinking water, and our people before the bank accounts of massive agribusinesses. 

It’s time we get real. Iowa’s water crisis isn’t going away. The dismissal of our case is certainly a setback, but we’re going to keep fighting to hold our elected officials accountable to us — their constituents. We will keep up the pressure on the legislature to take real, meaningful steps to protect us. We’ll keep advocating for bold solutions to this crisis. And we’ll keep working to break the stranglehold corporate agriculture has on our political system.

Help us guarantee we all have access to clean water for generations to come. Send a message to Iowa’s leadership!

Human Resources Director

Contact Email: [email protected]

Post Date: 07.23.21

Job Type: Full-time

Office Location: Washington, DC

Department: Human Resources

Job Description: 

The Human Resources Director will manage the HR processes of Food & Water Watch and Food & Water Action. The Director will manage the HR team and assist with labor relations, gathering, collecting, and maintaining documents and records required for contract and policy development, investigations, and negotiations. The HR Director will ensure that FWW hires and retains the most effective staff to accomplish its mission and is in compliance with labor law in multiple locations. A diverse staff is key to FWW effectiveness.

The HR Director is responsible for developing and executing human resource strategy in support of the overall business plan and strategic direction of the organization, specifically in the areas of succession planning, talent management, change management, organizational and performance management, training and development, and compensation. The HR Director provides strategic leadership by articulating HR needs and plans to the executive management team.         

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

  1. Supervises all HR activities, communications, reports, requests and documents created and received by the team.
  2. Handles labor relations and human resource inquiries related to policies, procedures, and bargaining agreements.
  3. Support, guide, train supervisors to help maintain effective working relationships with BU members.
  4. Serves as the initial contact and liaison for intake and assessment of employee complaints.
  5. Conducts initial interviews and gathers information for employee relations matters such as harassment allegations, work complaints, or other concerns; informs appropriate staff when additional investigation is required.
  6. Ensure that all personnel files are up-to-date with necessary documents.
  7. Interface between staff and health insurance broker to assist staff in resolving questions.
  8. Ensure pay bands across the organization are up-to-date and equitable.
  9. Work with finance to ensure benefits are accurately charged.
  10. Manage employee onboarding and offboarding.
  11. Responsible for recordkeeping related to hiring, termination, leave, transfer, and promotion particularly as related to Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and diversity initiatives.
  12. Collects information and data to assess cost and policy implications of negotiations and disputes. This may include management and union proposals, pay scales and wages, benefits, working conditions, and other mitigating circumstances.
  13. Conducts surveys, interviews, and other research related to human resource policies, compensation, and other labor negotiations; collects information and reports results to Managing Directors.
  14. Maintains knowledge and understanding of laws and regulations related to EEO, collective bargaining, unions, labor relations, and human resources.
  15. Prepares plans, policies, documents, and reports including EEO-1, organizational charts, labor agreements, and employee handbooks.
  16. Assists with preparation of documents and records required for contract negotiations, meetings, and negotiations with employee and labor organizations.
  17. Collaborates with senior leadership to understand the organization’s goals and strategy related to staffing, recruiting, and retention.
  18. Creates recruitment plans, interview schedules and evaluation standards in accordance with HR methodologies and labor laws.
  19. Research compensation standards set by industry and governing bodies in order to create salary structures and administer employee benefits.
  20. Monitors and ensures the organizations compliance with federal, state, and local employment laws and regulations, and recommended best practices; reviews and modifies policies and practices to maintain compliance.
  21. Performs other related duties as assigned.
  22. SUPPORTING OUR CULTURE OF PHILANTHROPY: All staff must assist in fundraising and development for the organization. All staff must demonstrate an understanding that our members and supporters make our work (and our salaries) possible and should provide the highest level of customer and member services to people outside the organization. While your job position does not require you to raise any particular amount, you are expected to always be an “ambassador” for FWW/FWA and our work. All staff are expected to help with and participate/attend events and other activities as appropriate that are organized for our supporters and donors. All staff are expected to be cognizant of fundraising opportunities and to share contacts and information that will help build and sustain FWW/FWA.

Requirements

  • Education: Bachelor’s degree, or equivalent experience required
  • Excellent interpersonal, writing and verbal skills are required
  • Passion for the mechanics of fundraising and building a culture of philanthropy
  • Approach interactions with donors and supporters with a customer-service mindset
  • Ability to work well with a wide range of people, under pressure in a fast-paced environment
  • Ability to work on multiple projects simultaneously with close attention to detail
  • Good computer skills are required, including strong proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite and Google Docs
  • Experience with Salesforce or similar database, or a demonstrated capacity to learn new technology quickly and effectively
  • Strong interest in and commitment to promoting the goals of Food & Water Watch

QUALIFICATIONS: To perform this job successfully, the person in this position has a high degree of contact with other staff; a moderate degree of contact with vendors and a low degree of contact with volunteers and donors.

The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.                                                  

Education/Experience: Bachelor’s degree in Human Resources, Labor Relations, Business or related field required. A minimum of five years progressively responsible, professional experience in collective bargaining and labor relations activities, including two years supervisory experience.

Computer Skills: An individual should be able to work in a computerized environment and have adequate knowledge of word processing, email, internet and spreadsheet software; in particular have coursework or certification in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint and proficiency with all other Microsoft Office products.

Click here to apply. Please include your resume, cover letter and three professional references to be considered.

We will review your application and if we feel that your knowledge, skills and abilities are potentially a good match for our organization, we will be in contact with you. Please include a Cover Letter with your submission. Position open until filled. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Food & Water Watch (FWW) strives for a diverse work environment and encourages women, people of color, LGBTQ individuals, and individuals with disabilities to apply.

Food & Water Watch is committed to the health and safety of its staff members. Moreover, FWW, as an organization, promotes science-based policy. Science clearly shows that unvaccinated populations drive the spread of the coronavirus and the emergence of new variants, and that unvaccinated people are more likely to contract COVID and experience severe symptoms. Effective immediately, prospective new staff members are required to provide proof of vaccination or request a waiver as a condition of their offer of employment.

Help us fix our broken systems and stand up against corporate control. Submit your résumé today!

It’s Time For An Urgent Intervention In The Food System Ruining Our Climate

Categories

Food System

by Mark Schlosberg

Wildfires, heatwaves, hurricanes and droughts: the deadly impacts of climate change are becoming more intense and devastating. While the transition to a real, renewable energy system is imperative to a livable climate future, it’s just as urgent to address the destructive impacts of our industrial food system. The current system is highly concentrated and exploitative, and it’s driving climate change and water shortages.

To address the climate crisis we must break up the big food monopolies and stop the practice of concentrating large numbers of animals on factory farms. The first step is passing the Farm System Reform Act. 

The Relationship Between Factory Farms and Climate Change

Factory farms drive climate change. Raising livestock on factory farms accounts for 14.5% of all human-induced greenhouse gas emissions, the largest contribution coming from producing corn and soy to feed factory-farmed animals. In fact, the top 20 meat and dairy corporations together contribute more greenhouse gases than the entire country of Germany, and together the top five contribute more than fossil fuel giants Exxon, Shell, or BP. These meat and dairy corporations are pushing factory farm expansion, further driving up greenhouse gas emissions, while family-scale livestock farms struggle to survive. 

Further, while factory farms drive water shortages through climate-induced droughts, they also directly poison vast quantities of freshwater across the country through the waste they produce. 

Agriculture is the leading known cause of pollution in U.S. rivers and streams and is the second-largest known contributor to the contamination of wetlands. Pollution from animal feeding operations threatens or impairs over 13,000 miles of U.S. rivers and streams and 60,000 acres of lakes and ponds. In one stark example, nearly 500,000 dairy cows on factory farms in Tulare County, California produce more manure waste than the human residents of the Los Angeles metropolitan area. 

We need to break this vicious cycle of factory farms polluting water and driving climate change, which causes water crises for people and the environment. 

An Even More Urgent Case For a Ban on Factory Farms 

Food & Water Watch called for a ban on factory farms in early 2018 because we knew the fragility of our food system. For years, our team has been educating and organizing against extensive corporate control and how it harms family farmers, rural communities, food chain workers and consumers. We knew that in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change we must address industrial agriculture. 

Less than two years later we were proud to work with lead sponsors Senator Cory Booker and Representative Ro Khanna to introduce the Farm System Reform Act in U.S. Congress, a visionary bill that includes a ban on new and expanding factory farms and a phaseout of existing facilities by 2040. Originally introduced in the Senate in December of 2019 and in the House in March of 2020, the Farm System Reform Act helped people to see that a better way is possible — and in fact critical — if we are to protect our water and climate as well as protect food chain workers, and ensure a safe and plentiful food supply. 

And now we’re doing it again — even bigger and bolder than last time.

Introducing the Farm System Reform Act in 2021

In July 2021, Senator Cory Booker and Representative Ro Khanna reintroduced the Farm System Reform Act in the new Congress with three original Senate co-sponsors and a number of new House co-sponsors. The bill is endorsed by a broad coalition of organizations including Food & Water Watch and Food & Water Action, the American Society of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Family Farm Action, the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, and Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. Over 100 individual farmers have also already signed a letter in support of the bill, with more joining every day.

This groundbreaking bill has quickly become the north star of the movement to ban factory farms and end corporate control of our food system and should be a key pillar of national efforts to address climate change. In addition to an immediate ban on new and expanding large factory farms and a phase-out of existing facilities by 2040, the Farm System Reform Act would also: 

  • Create a transition program to allow farmers to escape the contract model and shift to more sustainable forms of agriculture
  • Enact a series of market reforms that would make it possible for small growers to compete
  • Hold corporations responsible for their pollution 

The Farm System Reform Act is a bold and yet commonsense approach that would move us toward a food and farm system that works for us — instead of wealthy corporations only concerned with their own bottom lines. It would help to build the kind of resilient, regionally-based food system that we advocate for in our new report, Well-Fed. It would level the playing field for family-scale farms and help rebuild rural America. And it would provide a real solution to addressing the climate impacts of industrial agriculture — instead of more false solutions like factory farm gas (biogas) or carbon markets.

Do you share our vision for a just food system? Send a message to your Senators and Representatives today.

Political leaders need to hear from you. Send a quick message!

Top 5 Reasons Carbon Capture And Storage (CCS) Is Bogus

Categories

Climate and Energy

by Mark Schlosberg and Peter Hart

The idea of using technology to take carbon out of the air may at first blush sound like an attractive solution to our escalating climate crisis. But if you examine the details, the carbon capture “solution” is a mirage. 

Betting on carbon capture as a primary solution to the climate crisis is essentially the same as giving up. The only solution is to rapidly transition to 100% renewable energy in combination with energy efficiency and a less energy-intensive food system. 

Recently, carbon capture has been getting a lot of attention. It is a centerpiece of the oil and gas industry’s greenwashing efforts, the White House includes it as part of its climate agenda, and even some progressive media figures have promoted carbon capture and encouraged the left to embrace it as a so-called solution.

But as attractive as it may sound in theory, there are many good reasons to reject this failed energy-intensive so-called solution. Carbon capture will lock us into decades more of fossil fuels, is not feasible at scale, and diverts money and political attention from the real, bold solutions we need. 

Here are five reasons embracing carbon capture is a fool’s errand. 

1. Carbon Capture is an Expensive Failure

After billions of dollars in public and private investments over decades, there are no carbon capture success stories — only colossal failures. One of the largest was the Petra Nova coal plant in Texas, once the poster child for CO2 removal. But the plant consistently underperformed, before it finally closed for good last year. Another high-profile example — the San Juan Generating Station in New Mexico, touted as the largest capture project in the world — may already be headed to a similar fate. 

Between 2005 and 2012, the DOE spent $6.9 billion attempting to demonstrate the feasibility of CCS for coal, but little came of this investment, and between 2014 and 2016, less than 4 percent of the planned CCS capacity was deployed. The Biden administration wants to shift its focus to carbon capture for gas-fired power plants, but there’s no reason to think the outcome will be any different.

2. Carbon Capture is Energy Intensive

Running a carbon capture system is incredibly energy-intensive — it essentially requires building a new power plant to run the system, which would create another new source of air and carbon pollution. That undermines the whole goal of capturing carbon in the first place. While our country emits roughly 5 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere every year, removing 1 billion tons of that through direct air capture would require nearly the entire electricity output of the United States.

It’s also important to consider the scale of what would be needed. The Energy Department recently announced $12 million to fund ‘direct air capture’ projects and touted the possible removal of 100,000 tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. To put this in perspective, the largest corporate polluter in 2018 was responsible for releasing 119 million tons of CO2 equivalent — and that’s only one of them. 

3. Carbon Capture Actually Increases Emissions

A recent review of relevant research shows that due to the large amount of energy required to power carbon capture and the life cycle of fossil fuels, carbon capture in this country has actually put more CO2 into the atmosphere than it has removed. 

That’s not an accident. To the extent that there are successful capture projects, they exist at facilities where the carbon is injected into existing wells in order to extract more oil — a practice known as ‘enhanced oil recovery.’ While an oil company CEO might argue that doubling down on fossil fuels is an effective climate solution, the planet begs to differ. 

4. Storage Presents Significant Risks

There are also other significant risks related to the disposal and storage of carbon. Well failure during injection or a blowout could result in a release of large amounts of CO2;  storage locations can leak CO2,  as they are located close to fossil fuel reservoirs, where oil and gas wellbores provide a pathway for CO2 to escape to the surface.  Those storage leaks could contaminate groundwater and soil; and injection of CO2 could cause earthquakes, which have already been measured at injection sites. 

As Friends of the Earth noted recently, when a CO2 pipeline in a majority Black community in Mississippi ruptured last year, residents had to seek medical treatment, and the incident killed local plants and wildlife. 

5. Carbon Capture Trades Off with Other Critical Solutions

Wishful thinking about carbon capture isn’t just an ineffective response to the climate crisis — it’s dangerous. We have a small window where we can take the bold action needed to avert runaway climate chaos; counting on carbon capture’s effectiveness squanders the opportunity to enact actual emissions reductions (a phenomenon known as “mitigation deterrence”).

The reason that the oil and gas industry loves carbon capture is simple: It extends the fossil fuel era instead of ending it. Already, dirty energy companies are pitching the construction of new pipelines and fracked gas power plants and making totally empty promises about their ability to install capture technology to make them ‘clean.’ If carbon capture continues to fail to work, it doesn’t matter much to the company running the dirty power plant; they will just continue on with business as usual.

So long as fossil fuel companies, government officials, and even some progressive advocates are being fooled by carbon capture, there will be less pressure to actually stop climate pollution by putting an end to drilling and fracking and creating the political will needed for a rapid and just transition to 100% renewable energy.  

Your friends need to read this.