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July 16th, 2014

Fracking in Paradise, FL

By Vickie Machado

Organizers in Florida learned that the Dan A. Hughes Co. will cease operations at its Collier Hogan well site. While the company states that they took this action on their own, allies of Food & Water Watch have been pushing the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to revoke its permit at the Collier Hogan site and it looks like the Florida DEP will file a suit against Dan A. Hughes Co., to shut down permanently. The state will also seek $25,000 in penalties against the company. We see this as a victory, and Food & Water Watch Florida Organizer Vickie Machado tells us how it all unfolded.

I am a third generation South Floridian. Both my grandfather and my mother were born and raised in Miami, long before it’s present bustling nature of high-rises and the never-ending flow of traffic. I grew up hearing stories of how my grandfather watched Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach expand past their boarders to become the South Florida region of today.

While the expansion brought the wonder of new cultures, flavors, and styles, by the time my mother came of age, this growth also continually meant infringement upon natural areas, pushing houses, shopping centers and cars further west towards the beloved Everglades. As we continue to push the boundaries, I continue to worry about our populations’ impact on what’s left of our neighboring wetlands.

While development and construction weigh heavy on my heart, more recently my fears extend further beyond my backyard sea of grass to the western most boundaries of the Everglades. It is here, on the West coast of Florida, where something perhaps more harmful than development was threating this precious ecosystem.

The Dan A. Hughes Company was found acid fracking near Naples in Collier County, the western most region of the Everglades. The process of injecting acid under high pressures is a drilling procedure never before used in Florida. To me, this means they are using the most sensitive and important ecosystem in Florida as a lab rat for their scheme to make an easy buck. When issued a cease and desist order, the company said no and decided to pay a fine while continuing with operations.

In this situation, I realize our demand for cheap energy is also to blame, as we allow this debacle to unfold. It is our cars that are being driven, our homes being cooled and electrified and our excessive livelihoods being energized. It is also our government and lawmakers who are setting the policies that allow intensive resource extraction such as acid fracking to occur. As a Food & Water Watch Organizer on the east coat of Florida, I am grateful to the grassroots groups in Collier (namely the Stone Crab Alliance and the Conservancy of Southwest Florida) struggling for the integrity of our environment and our water on a daily basis. I am also grateful to Collier County as they requested the state to revoke the oil driller’s permit.

More recently, these efforts have led to the shut down of the Collier-Hogan well and a State driven lawsuit to permanently cease operations. This has been a huge victory in the eyes of Food & Water Watch and our grassroots coalition partners. While we celebrate this triumph, it is important to know the struggle is far from over.

While Dan A Hughes walks away, the public is forced to deal with the wastewater from the Collier-Hogan well, which is said to be on its way to Miami-Dade County for disposal in treatment facilities that were not built to deal with the chemicals from acid fracking. It is situations like these that show the problems of fracking will sooner or later make it to all of our backyards.

It is up to us to demand our lawmakers start listening to the concern people of Florida and place a ban upon extreme extraction and wastewater disposal. I want to ensure we still have a South Florida to call home with clean water and preserved wetlands. This being said, it is simply unacceptable for companies to engage in such environmentally degrading activities, only to later buy their way out of trouble and send the clean up to someone else’s home. 

3 Comments on Fracking in Paradise, FL

  1. Ana Santos says:

    I1m very concerned about this new way to get fuel for cars. In Brazil they started to talk about doing the same. For the companies only money is important. We need to fight back. We need a clean enviroment to live in, We can’t drink or breath gas.

  2. Susan spille says:

    Very good news. We need to ban fracking n especially the waste!

  3. Michelle Gale says:

    Thanks for this article about our little victory–little because Collier Resources is not going to just throw up its hands and say “Okay, so we won’t lease our mineral rights;” they’re going to go find themselves another wildcatter–but please keep in mind that Preserve Our Paradise took Dan A. Hughes to court, fought the DEP, fought the EPA, and fought this doggedly every step of the way. I say we owe ‘em a debt of gratitude.

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