Right to Water | Food & Water Watch
Victory! Cleveland passes resolution against antibiotic misuse on factory farms. more wins »
X

Stay Informed

Sign up for email to learn how you can protect food and water in your community.

   Please leave this field empty

I support Food & Water Watch because it is really the "watchdog" that is protecting and educating consumers one person at a time. If we each follow through with action we will change the world.
Brigid Sullivan

Fact Sheets: Right To Water

Fact Sheets Count: 7
May 28, 2014

Reading’s Water Lease and the Costs of Privatization

The Reading City Council is considering opening up the city’s water system to privatization.

November 8, 2013

An Overview of the Successful Public Purchase of the Felton Water System

The San Lorenzo Valley Water District purchased the Felton water system from California American Water. American Water and other companies have tried to distort this successful public purchase to undermine other local buyout efforts. Communities should not heed these corporate scare tactics. Felton has benefited from local, public control of its water services.

April 23, 2013

Keep a Nestlé Water Bottling Plant Out of the Columbia River Gorge

Nestlé Waters is determined to build and operate a water bottling plant in the Columbia River Gorge town of Cascade Locks, seeking to bottle and sell essential spring water resources.

October 15, 2012

No apueste a Wall Street: la financiarización de la naturaleza y el riesgo para nuestros bienes comunes

    Con demasiada frecuencia, cuando un economista o banquero mira los bosques vírgenes o los ríos fluyendo libremente, no ve la naturaleza — ve “capital natural.” Este concepto promueve la idea de que a nuestros recursos naturales se les debe atribuir un valor y que deben administrarse bajo principios basados en el mercado de […]

September 6, 2012

Private Equity, Public Inequity: The Public Cost of Private Equity Takeovers of U.S. Water Infrastructure

Investment bankers and other major financial players are increasingly interested in taking control of water and sewer services across the United States. Private equity vehicles are armed with more than $100 billion for infrastructure worldwide. Although most deals in the U.S. water utility market have involved existing private sector companies, a number of fund managers anticipate that the ongoing fiscal crisis will drive some governments to privatize their water infrastructure. To make that prediction a reality, major financial interests are backing various government proposals that facilitate privatization and private investment bankers and other major financial players are increasingly interested in taking control of water and sewer services across the United States. Private equity vehicles are armed with more than $100 billion for infrastructure worldwide. Although most deals in the U.S. water utility market have involved existing private sector companies, a number of fund managers anticipate that the ongoing fiscal crisis will drive some governments to privatize their water infrastructure. To make that prediction a reality, major financial interests are backing various government proposals that facilitate privatization and private financing of public infrastructure.

August 31, 2012

Allentown’s Water Gambit: An Irresponsible and Risky Lease

Allentown is considering a risky and potentially very costly ploy to raise money to cover some of its pension liabilities. Mayor Ed Pawlowski has proposed a 50-year lease of the water and sewer systems that he hopes will produce $150 million to $200 million in upfront cash for the city.1 This money, however, is not cheap. Any upfront payment that the city receives is a costly loan that households and local businesses will repay through their water bills for decades. While Allentown’s fiscal difficulties are certainly serious, the city must address the issue directly and avoid budget gimmicks like water privatization that will increase costs for generations of Allentonians.

January 9, 2012
Filed in: , ,

The Road to Rio+20: Why You Should Care and What You Can Do

From June 20–22, 2012 in Rio de Janiero, Brazil, heads of state, UN agencies, and global stakeholders will convene for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD) — commonly known as “Rio+20.”

The world is at a crossroads: the convergence of global economic meltdown and unchecked global warming is driving action in the streets, from the Arab Spring to the Occupy Movement. We must seize this momentum and use Rio+20 to force a paradigm shift.