Quantcast
Health | Food & Water Watch
Victory! Cleveland passes resolution against antibiotic misuse on factory farms. more wins »
X

Stay Informed

Sign up for email to learn how you can protect food and water in your community.

   Please leave this field empty

I support Food & Water Watch simply because I have a family and want them to be healthy, happy and do not want anyone to take advantage of them.

Cassandra Nguyen

Fact Sheets: Health

Fact Sheets Count: 7
September 9, 2013

Save Antibiotics for Medicine, Not Factory Farms

Antibiotics are critical tools for human medicine, yet far more antibiotics are given to food animals than to sick people, and this practice is putting all of us at risk. Agriculture accounts for 80 percent of antibiotics sold in the United States, using drugs from every major class of antibiotics used in human medicine. The way that most antibiotics are used on livestock, such as chickens, pigs and cattle, has been linked to the rise of antibiotic-resistant (AR) bacteria. This means that the bacteria can survive exposure to antibiotic drugs that had previously been effective in killing them.

January 23, 2013

Natural Gas Pipelines: Problems From Beginning to End

The oil and gas industry plans to massively expand a labyrinth of pipelines to market natural gas extracted from the Marcellus Shale and other rock formations using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. But allowing the industry to build out its sprawling pipeline infrastructure and to lock-in decades more of U.S. dependence on natural gas would be a colossal mistake. The industry’s pipeline projects must be stopped.

December 5, 2012

The Economic Cost of Food Monopolies

The agriculture and food sector is unusually concentrated, with just a few companies dominating the market in each link of the food chain. In most sectors of the U.S. economy, the four largest firms control between 40 and 45 percent of the market, and many economists maintain that higher levels of concentration can start to erode competitiveness. Yet according to data compiled by the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2012, in the agriculture and food sector, the four largest companies controlled 82 percent of the beef packing industry, 85 percent of soybean processing, 63 percent of pork packing, and 53 percent of broiler chicken processing.

August 16, 2012

Keep Tar Sands Oil Out of New England

Enbridge Inc., Canada’s largest transporter of crude oil, claims to no longer be pursuing its ‘Trailbreaker’ plan as first proposed in 2008: to run Canadian tar sands oil through an aging pipeline that stretches across northern New England from Montreal, Canada, to Portland, Maine. Yet given that efforts to send tar sands oil south to refineries in Texas through the proposed Keystone XL pipeline — as well as efforts to send the oil west from Alberta to British Columbia — have face stiff opposition and stalled, New England remains at risk.

May 24, 2012

Poultry Litter Incineration: An Unsustainable Solution

The poultry industry continues to influence lawmakers to prioritize corporate interests over public health, sound food policy and environmental concerns. Citizens in Maryland and in other states are being asked to bail the industry out of its massive waste problem by financing poultry litter incinerators.

February 9, 2010

Triclosan: What the Research Shows

A growing list of household and personal care products are advertised as “antibacterial” because they contain a chemical called triclosan. While the manufacturers of these products want you to think triclosan protects you from harmful bacteria, it turns out that it may be doing more harm than good.

December 3, 2009

What’s Lurking In Your Soap?

Who knew that washing your hands could harm your health and the environment? Thanks to the chemical industry, a hazardous antibacterial compound called triclosan is now an ingredient in many household and personal care products such as soaps, cleaners, cosmetics, clothing, and even children‚ toys. While consumers might think triclosan can protect them from harmful bacteria, it turns out that the use of this dangerous chemical in household products is no more effective than soap and water — and may be doing more harm than good.