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Dave Mazza

Fact Sheets: Food Safety

Fact Sheets Count: 17
January 14, 2014

Fast Tracking Corporate Power: Investor-State Resolution and the TPP

The TPP’s contentious “investor-state dispute resolution” allows a corporation to sue federal, state and local governments if it believes that a law or regulation will negatively affect its bottom line.

September 9, 2013

Save Antibiotics for Medicine, Not Factory Farms

Antibiotics are critical tools for human medicine, yet far more antibiotics are given to food animals than to sick people, and this practice is putting all of us at risk. Agriculture accounts for 80 percent of antibiotics sold in the United States, using drugs from every major class of antibiotics used in human medicine. The way that most antibiotics are used on livestock, such as chickens, pigs and cattle, has been linked to the rise of antibiotic-resistant (AR) bacteria. This means that the bacteria can survive exposure to antibiotic drugs that had previously been effective in killing them.

April 23, 2013

Ractopamine

Using ractopamine, a drug that makes livestock grow lean meat faster, may pose human health risks and can compromise animal health and welfare.

April 8, 2013

Monsanto: A Corporate Profile

Roundup herbicide. Agent Orange. PCBs. Genetically engineered seeds. These may not seem related, but they all have something in common: Monsanto.

December 5, 2012

The Economic Cost of Food Monopolies

The agriculture and food sector is unusually concentrated, with just a few companies dominating the market in each link of the food chain. In most sectors of the U.S. economy, the four largest firms control between 40 and 45 percent of the market, and many economists maintain that higher levels of concentration can start to erode competitiveness. Yet according to data compiled by the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2012, in the agriculture and food sector, the four largest companies controlled 82 percent of the beef packing industry, 85 percent of soybean processing, 63 percent of pork packing, and 53 percent of broiler chicken processing.

September 19, 2012

How Much Will Labeling Genetically Engineered Foods Really Cost?

Since the first genetically engineered (GE) crops were introduced in the United States in the 1990s, consumers have not been able to tell whether they are eating these controversial new ingredients. And whenever the subject of mandatory labeling of GE foods comes up, the food industry claims that labeling will be prohibitively expensive.

August 31, 2012

Most Americans Want Labeling of Genetically Engineered Foods

When it comes to labeling genetically engineered (GE) foods, the United States lags behind nearly 50 developed nations, including all European Union member states, Australia, Brazil, China, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, Saudi Arabia and South Korea. The European Union requires all food, animal feeds and processed products with biotech content to bear GE labels.

July 23, 2012

GE Crops, Chemicals and the Environment

Roundup, an herbicide produced by Monsanto that contains the active ingredient glyphosate, has been vigorously applied to crops for years. Most genetically engineered (GE) crops are designed to be tolerant of specially tailored herbicides. Farmers can spray the herbicide on their fi elds, killing the weeds without harming the GE crops. With the development of Roundup Ready crops, the application intensity of Roundup has only increased.

July 19, 2012

Greenwashing GE Crops

The biotechnology industry is aggressively promoting the environmental sustainability of genetically engineered (GE) crops. The industry claims that GE crops can reduce herbicide use, increase yields to feed a hungry planet, and develop new crops that are adapted to climate change.

How GE Crops Hurt Farmers

With the rise of GE crops, coexistence between organic, non-GE and GE production has become more diffi cult due to the potential for gene flow and commingling of crops at both the planting and harvesting levels.

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