Farm Bill | Food & Water Watch
Victory! Cleveland passes resolution against antibiotic misuse on factory farms. more wins »
X

Stay Informed

Sign up for email to learn how you can protect food and water in your community.

   Please leave this field empty

Food & Water Watch is a tireless champion in the fight to preserve our right to the untainted fruits of the earth. Their leadership in putting people above corporate profits is invaluable.
Dave Mazza

Fact Sheets: Farm Bill

Fact Sheets Count: 17
August 4, 2011

FOODSTAMPED Action: Economic Justice for Farmers and Eaters

The earnings of all but the richest people in America have been stagnant for the past four decades, making it harder for both urban and rural families to put healthy food on the table. The recession made the problem of food insecurity worse. By 2009, one in every seven rural residents and one in every nine urban residents received food stamps. How can we turn things around and build a healthier, fairer food system?

April 17, 2011
Filed in:

The Farm Bill: Federal Policy that Affects the Bay Area

Every five years, Congress passe a Farm Bill that determines how hundreds of millions of dollars will be spent by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We need good food policy so that everyone has access to healthy food and family farmers can make a living.

March 22, 2011
Filed in: ,

Good Food for All

As consumers become more aware of the impacts food production has on our health and environment, it’s becoming clear that our food system is broken. The system fails many low-income consumers in even more fundamental ways, and growing numbers of Americans struggle to feed their families healthy food on a regular basis.

February 26, 2011

Rebuilding Local Food Systems

Not long ago, towns all over rural America had vibrant economies based on farming and agriculture. There were independent grain mills and local dealers for seeds, fertilizers and other inputs, as well as a slaughter facility to process farmers’ livestock. The income from agriculture sources then circulated throughout the community, providing steady jobs and stable income for a large portion of the town’s population. But things have changed. Now many rural downtowns lay silent, with empty buildings where locally owned business once were.

February 25, 2011

Rebuilding Local Food Systems for Consumers

It’s trendy for food retailers to label some of their produce as coming from “local” farmers or to feature specific farmers in their ads. But why is it such a novelty to carry a product that is produced near where it is sold? And why is it such a small portion of the food, and usually only fresh fruits and vegetables? Is it that hard for grocery stores to sell food that comes from regional or local producers?

February 24, 2011

A Farm Bill for Consumers

Our food system is broken, and it didn’t happen by accident. Rampant consolidation in the food industry has left control of much of our food in the hands of a few large firms which serve as a bottleneck between 2 million farmers and more than 300 million consumers. Farmers receive lower prices for their products while consumers face higher prices at the grocery store. As more farms bow to the economic pressure to “get big or get out,” intensive production practices, like raising livestock on factory farms, put public health and the environment at risk.

February 22, 2011

A Farm Bill for Rural America

Our food system is broken, and it didn’t happen by accident. Rampant consolidation in the food industry has left control of much of our food in the hands of a few large firms which serve as a bottleneck between 2 million farmers and more than 300 million consumers. Farmers receive lower prices for their products while consumers face higher prices at the grocery store. As more farms bow to the economic pressure to “get big or get out,” rural communities have suffered.

February 21, 2011

Farm Subsidies 101

Whether the topic is obesity, climate change or even the budget deficit, there are few debates these days when U.S. farm policy doesn’t get mentioned. One popular recommendation to fix our farm policy is slashing payments to farmers entirely, or redirecting that money into other programs. Proponents of this approach claim it would encourage farmers to shift to crops other than corn or soybeans and would protect the environment. It’s an appealing concept — save money and stop promoting industrial agriculture at the same time. The problem is, when it comes to the food system, it’s never quite that simple.

December 8, 2010

Consolidation and Buyer Power in the Grocery Industry

Food companies throughout the entire food chain are rapidly consolidating, leaving just a handful of powerful middlemen between 2 million American farmers and more than 300 million consumers. One of the most critical links in the food chain that has suffered the effects of this consolidation is the retail sector. A smaller number of grocery stores and supermarkets are exerting more and more control over which foods reach the mass market and the prices families pay at the checkout case. As food retail companies grow larger, so too does their influence on food processors and manufacturers, encouraging consolidation up the food chain, all the way to farmers growing crops and raising livestock.

August 3, 2010

Horizontal Consolidation and Buyer Power in the Beef Industry

The beef-packing industry is more powerful and consolidated now than it was a century ago when Congress enacted the Packers & Stockyards Act to break up the beef monopolies. Beef packing is the most concentrated industry in the meat and poultry sector. Meatpackers have merged into a few dominant players that slaughter and market almost all of the beef products in the United States. Today, just four firms slaughter more than four out of five beef cattle. This concentration gives large packers tremendous leverage over independent cattle producers. The beef-packing industry has also expanded beyond slaughter and processing and now large packers own their own cattle and operate feedlots, thus controlling supply through all stages of production. These practices enable the meatpackers to drive down cattle prices while keeping consumer beef prices high.

Page 1 of 212